Blog Archives

The Imaginative World of Charles Beaumont: Vote for His Best Twilight Zone Story

The most famous writer of The Twilight Zone? Rod Serling, obviously. Besides creating, producing, and hosting the series, he penned no fewer than 92 scripts for it. But after him?

Charles Beaumont

Most fans, I think, would pick Richard Matheson. And who could blame them? The legendary author’s contributions to the Zone include some truly iconic episodes, such as “Little Girl Lost,” “The Invaders,” and “Nightmare at 20,000 Feet.”

Few fans would name Charles Beaumont. And that’s a shame. Not only was he the most prolific Zone writer after Serling — logging 22 scripts to Matheson’s 14 — but his fertile imagination created some of the most mind-bending tales in the fifth dimension.

So I thought it might be fun to give fans a chance to select their favorite Beaumont episode, the same way I did with Matheson back in 2013. In fact, I was thinking about doing a new Matheson poll post when it occurred to me to finally do one for Beaumont. I’ll circle back to Matheson soon enough, but let’s give Beaumont some much-deserved attention.

Read the rest of this entry

Which Videotaped Episode of the Twilight Zone is Best? Now You Can Cast Your Vote

One of the many hallmarks of The Twilight Zone is how good it looks. Rod Serling promised viewers “television’s elites,” and we got that — both in front of and behind the camera. Each episode was a visual feast, filled with clear, shadow-laden shots that outshines much of what we see on TV even today.

“Walking Distance”

Which is why the six videotaped episodes that popped up in Season 2 stick out like a Kanamit’s sore thumb. Even if you enjoy the stories (and I do, for the most part), it’s a clear step down from the vivid film images we get in the other 150 episodes.

But I’m not here today to dwell on that. (For more on why they were filmed that way, try this short post.) I’m here to ask a basic question: No matter where you stand on the videotaped episodes, which one do you consider the best?

Even if you cringe at the overall look of them, I’m betting most fans still can pick a favorite. So if you’re not among that tiny group who swears they can’t even watch them, how about casting a vote?

Here are the candidates:

Read the rest of this entry

“Light and Shadow”: A Look at Twilight Zone’s Directors

“The Twilight Zone will be directed, written, produced, and acted by television’s elite.” —Serling before TZ premiered

I focus heavily here on the writing of Rod Serling and other talented authors — and rightly so. Their imaginative scripts were the launching pad for some of the most memorable and timeless television ever filmed.

It's a Good Life6

But you need more than that to create a Twilight Zone episode. To truly bring the fifth dimension to life, you need first-rate actors in front of the camera, and a top-notch crew behind it.

I couldn’t help reflecting on the crucial role played by the head of that crew, the director, when I heard that James Sheldon had died on March 12. His many credits include six TZ episodes, three of which are bona fide fan favorites: “A Penny For Your Thoughts”, “Long Distance Call” and “It’s a Good Life“.* Read the rest of this entry

Serling’s Brief Journey to the Videotape Zone

“This episode looks funny. Was it broadcast live?”

Hardly a Twilight Zone marathon goes by without at least one or two people tagging my Twitter page with a question like that. And when they do, it’s because they’re watching one of six episodes from Season 2: “The Lateness of the Hour”, “The Night of the Meek”, “The Whole Truth”, “Twenty Two”, “Static” or “Long Distance Call”.

lateness-of-the-hour5

The reason they “look funny”? They were videotaped, not filmed.

Why? Let’s turn to the oracle we all use at some point when we’re doing “research” — Wikipedia. Its entry for “The Whole Truth” notes: Read the rest of this entry

To Serve Twilight Zone Fans

I have news for you, ladies and gentlemen. I have discovered that … people are alike all over.

Fortunately, I’m not saying that from behind the bars of an interplanetary zoo. No, the resemblance I’m referring to is much more benign than a penchant for treating other races as if they were a species to be gawked at.

1 (5)

I’m talking about a love for the works of Rod Serling, and more specifically, his landmark TV series, The Twilight Zone. It’s been exactly three years since I began hosting the Night Gallery Twitter page, and if there’s one thing I’ve learned over the last 1,096 days, it’s that you can find Serling fans everywhere.

Men and women, adults and children, from every race, creed and color you can imagine. People from every spot on the political and religious spectrums. Individuals who would never talk to each other in “real life” follow this page, united in a love for the work of one of the 20th century’s most beloved writers. Read the rest of this entry